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(A recurring theme on my blog is me posting things while thinking to myself, “I bet every other blogger and their dog has already covered this ground, but who cares, I’m going to go ahead and post about it anyway,” so apologies if, in fact, your dog has already showed you all of this.)

Yeah, I could live there is a D16 feature wherein I post pictures of homes I want to break into, kick out the inhabitants and move in. This time, though, it’s not a home—it’s Bar Luce, a café in Milan designed by Wes Anderson.

It is perfect. I mean, of course it’s perfect. It’s perfect because Wes Anderson designed it. It’ll also make your teeth hurt and possibly rot from all the sweetness, because Wes Anderson designed it. NOW LET ME LIVE THERE.

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This photo and above: Attilio Maranzano. Courtesy Fondazione Prada. (And yes, that’s a Zissou pinpall machine!)

I’m not sure where I first saw a photo of Bar Luce, but I pretty much immediately thereafter wound up in a candy-colored hole on Instagram, looking at the #barluce hashtag. OMG. I kind of want an Instagram photo of everyone in the place Instagramming everything, because every inch of it is ready for your carefully composed, artfully cropped, precisely balanced square format shots and your Crema filter. Or F2 on VSCO with a smidge of fading, whichever! I’m partial to combining the two, but…well, I digress. Here are some of my favorite Instagrams of Bar Luce.

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Photos, as numbered: 1. cupofcouple, 2. moroabiti, 3. frederica_esse, 4. beamily, 5. grinning_soul_lady, 6. chuidelphine, 7. captainandclark, 8. valerie.b_

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Herman Miller modular sofas, via Cooper Hewitt

It’s a beautiful day in America. How far we’ve come! To reiterate and expand upon something I wrote four years ago:

To every tireless LGBT advocate who has fought for equal rights for decade; to Justices Sotomayor, Ginsburg, Kagan, Breyer, and Kennedy; and to everyone who wasn’t afraid to SPEAK OUT and ACT UP in order to get this done—THANK YOU.

And to all of my beloved friends who until today were denied the right to choose to marry if and who they wish, thank you for hanging in there. I never took for granted that I could do what you couldn’t without a second thought. And I love you so much.

Have the BEST Pride weekend EVER, America. I love you!

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Photo by Fiona Galbraith

When I spotted the photo above on sfgirlbybay last week, my jaw dropped. That yellow sink. I’m so used to seeing colored sinks in ’60s and ’70s kitchens, and this context—the rustic wood, the classic subway tiles—is so vastly different that it’s sort of jarring. In a really, really good way. And that got me thinking about brightly colored sinks in general, and how they really kind of went by the wayside when the ’80s ushered in the era of stainless steel sinks and…beige. So much beige.

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Typo theirs, not mine.

Last fall, Daniel and I went on a trip to Wisconsin to visit the nice people at Kohler. One of the highlights of our stay there was the museum on the lower level of the Design Center—which, by the way, is a must-visit if you’re ever in the Kohler-Sheboygan area. The museum documents Kohler’s history going back to its founding in 1873, and it was truly fascinating to see physical examples of bathroom and kitchen trends over such a large span of time all in one space. They had a really cool chart (here’s an online version) showing the evolution of their color palette over the years.

I honed right in on the 1967 additions: Avocado and Tiger Lily. SO GOOD. I grew up during a time when everyone was making fun of matching Avocado and Harvest Gold kitchen suites (side note: OH MY GOD), and I fully admit I didn’t start to see the appeal until about ten years ago. I can’t say that I love everything about the kitchen trends of the time (mushroom curtains, I’m looking at you), but those bold sinks and colorful countertops? Hell yeah!

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Photo via El Cosmico

My next memorable sink experience was when Daniel and I (apparently all of my big sink moments happen with Daniel, which is as it should be) took a vacation to Marfa, Texas, and stayed at El Cosmico in a refurbished 1950s trailer, the Imperial Mansion. The whole thing was incredible, but my favorite part? The kitchen, which was outfitted with orange Formica countertops and a pale pink sink. I know that kind of pastel is a bit older than the bright sinks I’m talking about in this post, but I need to mention it because it really got me thinking more about the appeal of “dated” colors in the kitchen and unexpected combinations.

Speaking of orange…

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Photo by Wary Meyers on Instagram

YES! YES! This is a 1974 American Standard Fiesta sink, and it belongs to designers, authors, scavengers, soap sculptors, candlemakers, artists and all-around cool people Linda Wary Meyers and John Meyers, otherwise known as Wary Meyers. After picking it up years ago at a salvage yard, they recently installed it in their Maine home.

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Photo by Wary Meyers on Instagram

Well, how about that? Screaming red-orange sinks look pretty awesome with solid white Corian countertops. (And those mismatched knobs! I bow down.)

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Clockwise: Photos via 4 Fraziers, Retro Renovation, Retro Renovation, Antique Addictions

When I was digging around for examples of vintage, brightly-colored sinks used in contemporary renovations (there are very few, by the way), I came across some really nice ones that were for sale on Etsy and via Retro Renovation, as well as a SUPER cool bright yellow one which, tragically, was documented before being hauled off to a trash heap. RIP, rad yellow sink.

eBay turns up surprisingly few ’60s/’70s colored kitchen sinks, but there are two red cast iron American Standard bathroom sinks listed right now. Can you imagine how wild they would look side-by-side in an new bathroom with floor-to-ceiling white hex tiles?!

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Scans by Click Americana

I love these American Standard and Kohler ads from 1968 and 1966, respectively. They really make it sound like washing the dishes in that avocado sink is akin to driving a sports car. And that Kohler color range…wow. The cobalt blue! Heart-eyes. Again, I don’t love the rest of the decor, but the sinks are winners.

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Photos of The Unique Space via Remodelista

A few years ago Jonathan Adler did a limited-edition collection of sinks for Kohler in bright colors, but they’re just not the same. I don’t doubt that they can look great in use (see above) and they’re much more fun than this snooze-fest (don’t get me wrong, I like to snooze, but I also like options), but the colors are a little too “clean” for me. I prefer the bold dirtiness of the ’60s shades.

So is anyone making enameled cast iron sinks in bright colors anymore? Not that I could find. If you’re listening, Kohler…now might be the right time to bring back Tiger Lily and Blueberry!

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Yeah, I could live there is a D16 feature wherein I post pictures of homes I want to break into, kick out the inhabitants and move in. This week, I’m staying local! I’m going right down the road to my former Brooklyn neighboorhood, DUMBO, where interior stylist Martin Bourne and fashion stylist Leilin López live.

So…HOLY COLOR. That hot pink Wegner Teddy Bear chair is killing me. I want that chair in my life. I want to come home from work every day, climb into it with a cup of tea and a dog on each side of me, and sit there for hours.

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Pale greens and blues aren’t typically where I tend to go color-wise, but I love it here. If everything were white (which is probably what I’d do), the space would still be gorgeous…but it wouldn’t feel as warm as it does here. It’s tough to make an open loft feel this homey. I love it.

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Such a nice office area! Simple steel sawhorse brackets combined with regular old 2x4s are a great way to make huge worktops for very little money.

Those Hugo Guinness pigeon linocuts have been on my wishlist forever. Someday! Sigh…

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Hello there, giant dining table. I love long, shallow tables, at least ones that don’t feel formal. Like the desks above, this dining table—made by artist Jarrett Mellenbruch—appears to have been constructed from very basic materials. It’s a really lovely design. Combined with the Wegner and Børge Mogensen chairs, I’m in heaven.

You can view more photos of Bourne and Lopez’s home at Architectural Digest Spain.

All photographs by Pete Bermejo for Architectural Digest Spain

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Photo by Frederik Vercruysse via Dwell

Yeah, I could live there is a D16 feature wherein I post pictures of homes I want to break into, kick out the inhabitants and move in. Today, we’re heading 15 miles northeast of Antwerp to the Brecht, Belgium, home of Rini van Beek.

Despite the fact that they’re not the most practical when it comes to usable living space, I’ve got a thing for A-frame houses. Between that an my affinity for black exteriors, when this little cutie turned up in Dwell a couple of years ago, I got major heart-eyes. They tweeted a link to the back issue a few days ago, and my adoration was renewed.

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Photo by Frederik Vercruysse via Dwell

The office extension on the side of Van Beek’s house was designed by a team from Belgium-based dmvA. Because of local building codes, only 290 square feet could be added to the original structure, but…all that glass! All that nature! All that white! I wish I could see before photos to compare, but the whole thing looks totally magical. What a lovely place to live and work.

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Photo by Frederik Vercruysse via Dwell

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Photo by Mick Couwenbergh via Divisare

I looooooove that Tufty-Time sofa. I love the shape, the proportions, the color…and the fact that it’s called “Tufty-Time.” Someday, when I’m a billionaire, I’ll line the walls of my entire home with Tufty-Time sofas.

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Photo by Mick Couwenbergh via Divisare

What a nice little kitchen! I have no idea why someone would need two sinks in a kitchen this small, but I’m sure there’s a reason I’m not considering. And I do kind of want to slide a vintage rug in there when I move in…

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Photo by Mick Couwenbergh via Divisare

Yes, it’s a shirt. And yes, this is a subject I’ve delved into a few times on the blog in the past in the context of my approach to home renovation and my own self-image (side note: I need to re-read that post today), but James Victore—designer, artist, teacher, truth-speaker, all-around hero—nails it on a regular basis:

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Feck Perfuction

“Designers are too concerned with the idea of ‘perfection.’

“Perfection is the death of creativity. Perfection lacks spontaneity and surprise, instead it assumes ‘knowing’ and certainty. Creativity is about being OPEN and curious but perfection is closed tight in its search for an answer. ONE ‘right’ answer—but creativity is not math. Perfection also assumes that you are smarter than your audience because you know the ‘right way’ and the ‘rules.’ But this attitude leaves no room for your audience to be involved in your process. Creativity, like a good joke, slowly pieces together in your audience’s brain until it explodes with ‘A-HA!.’

“Perfection stops you from starting projects or even relationships because you are not ready or perfect. And it stops you from finishing or shipping projects because they are not ready or perfect. The weather, the economy, the atmosphere will never be perfect, your timing will never be right, you will never be perfect. But you know what’s better than perfect? Done. Done is better than prefect.”

#DesignLikeYouGiveADamn

Boom.

I’m currently taking James Victore’s Bold & Fearless Poster Design course at CreativeLive, and it’s FANTASTIC. I don’t care what you do for a living, what you wish you did for a living, or how much experience you have in whatever it is that you do: This course is for everyone. Highly, highly recommended!

UPDATE: I just got an email alert letting me know that Bold & Fearless Poster Design is now 25% off! Use the code Victore2015 before 2/1/16 to get the discount. Nice!!

I took his Radical Typography course on Skillshare last year, too—also incredible. Sometimes you just need that push toward fearless imperfuction!

Image via James Victore’s Instagram

Yesterday I took a peek at all of the new things coming to IKEA next month (some of these things have been available in Europe for a while, but we’re slow to get new stuff here in the US sometimes), and I am so blown away that I almost don’t even know where to start. I’m sure lots of other blogs will, of course, be showcasing the new lines in their entirety, so I’m just pulling a bunch of my favorites. There’s so much good stuff. Sometimes IKEA just really nails it, you know?

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✚ DALSHULT/SLÄHULT table, $189 Solid birch with white laminate top
✚ KRUSNING lamp shade, $9.99 Paper / design by Sigga Heimis

I adore this dining table. The trestle base is so quintessentially Scandinavian, and immediately brings to mind Hans Wegner’s classic X-leg design. The shape of the top makes me think of Piet Hein’s Superelipse tables. It’s a gorgeous combination. I really wish I had somewhere to put this table to use.

The lamp is the work of Malmö-based designer Sigga Heimis, and it’s made of paper. It can be shaped however you like!

Because I know it will come up, let’s talk about the much-beloved FROSTA stools pictured here. They’re clearly heavily inspired by Alvar Aalto’s Stool 60 (years ago, I modified a pair to make them even more Aalto-esque), but they’ve also managed to become an IKEA classic over the years. Sadly (some might say traumatically), IKEA discontinued FROSTA in the North American market a couple of years ago. They made a comeback of sorts in 2014, but only with tops painted yellow and red. It’s really a shame, because the banded-ply edge of the unpainted version is really what made it so nice! It’s still available in the European market, though, so if you had to cram a couple in a suitcase…

IKEA, if you’re listening, bring the original FROSTA stools back to North America!

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✚ REBBESTAD/RYGGESTAD table, $179 Black-stained solid pine
✚ RISATORP kitchen cart, $59.99 Steel & solid birch handle / design by Wiebke Braasch
✚ RISATORP basket, $12.99 Steel & bent birch veneer / design by Wiebke Braasch

Another great dining table with nice legs! I’m really happy to see IKEA incorporating more true black-stained pieces like this and the OLOFSTORP cabinet I hung in my dining room. It’s a very nice change from that weird brown-black color that’s been prevalent on their darker furniture for so long.

I’m really digging the whole RISATORP line. That combination of birch and powder-coated white steel gets an A+ from me. I can see using that cart in any number of rooms, from kitchens to bathrooms to art studios to entryways.

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Another look at the RISATORP kitchen cart. Those wheels are beautiful!

Side note: Mmmmm, Brussels sprouts. I’m going to have to make my mapled Brussels sprouts recipe this weekend!

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✚ NORNÄS queen bed frame, $299 Lacquered solid pine
✚ NORNÄS nightstand, $89 Untreated solid pine

First of all, hats off to the stylists who put this room together. The combination of bare plywood walls and a painted floor (that blue!) is perfection.

The solid pine pieces in the NORNÄS collection (seen here and and the next two photos) are the work of brother and sister design team Marianne Hagberg and Knut Hagberg. All of the wood used to manufacture this line is sourced in the far north of Sweden, cut in a waste-minimizing manner from well-managed forests. IKEA has received a lot of criticism in the past for deforestation practices, and I am glad to see them taking some steps in the right direction. It may not be everything, but it’s something. (I’m also pleased to see even more solid wood in IKEA’s collection, since those are the pieces that can absolutely last for generations!)

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✚ TNORNÄS table, $199 Untreated solid pine
✚ NORNÄS bench, $89 Untreated solid pine

Like many of the pieces in the NORNÄS line, both the bench and table seen here arrive unpainted, made of untreated wood—the legs of the bench have been painted black for this shoot. Yes, that means you’d have to treat the top of the table with something (wax, poly, whatever works best for your purposes), but it’s so nice to have the option to easily paint or stain this type of furniture. I personally love the look of pine, but imagine that table with the legs painted white, or the bench painted entirely yellow. They’d take on a whole new feel.

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✚ NORNÄS wall cabinet, $79 Untreated solid pine & tempered glass

Man, how I love a good wall cabinet. There are several good glass-front pieces in the NORNÄS line, three of them wall-mounted and one with legs. All have really nice beveled, mitered corners, and again, the untreated wood allows you to paint them however you wish.

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✚ SPRUTT cabinet, $89.99 Powder-coated steel / Design by Marcus Arvonen
✚ SPRUTT knob rack, $24.99 Powder-coated steel
✚ SPRUTT cart, $39.99 Powder-coated steel & plastic

The SPRUTT collection is so much fun, and fits right in with other great powder-coated steel IKEA stuff like their ubiquitous PS locker and the cork-topped KVISSLE office storage series, a personal favorite of mine.

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The SPRUTT cabinet is particularly cool. What is it about things that resemble card files?? I guess it’s the promise of being SO organized that you require not just one or two separate drawers, but nine. And labels. To be honest, labels kind of stress me out, so I like that they’ve just used colors and shapes in this styling shot. I can get behind that. Where do you think you could use a cabinet like this? It’s pretty substantial at 12″ deep, so it could even work in the kitchen for storing extra flatware, napkins, jars of spices…it’s a great piece. So many possibilities!

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And finally, the SPRUTT knob rack. How can you not love this?! Ahhhh, that bright yellow. So good!! Keys, necklaces, dog leashes, scarves…this thing would be great in an entryway where you don’t have much clearance since it’s less than 3″ deep—but at 63″ wide, it’ll still add visual interest. I could even see just mounting it on the wall as a decorative object, honestly.

Also, I now need white Swedish headphones.

All images courtesy of IKEA

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Interior by Antonio Martins / Via Remodelista

HELLO! It’s 2015. How about some nice kitchens with vintage rugs in them to start off the new year? I’ve been on a quest to find the perfect rug for the kitchen at the house for quite a while now, and I keep coming back to these photos—this is exactly what I want. I love the way that worn-in, vintage rugs take the edge off of black and white.

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From Hither & Thither

Yeah, technically this rug is in a sitting area next to the kitchen, but the effect is the same. So soft and warm. (That row of Tom Dixon-esque pendants the homeowners bought in Bali ain’t too shabby, either. And yeah, I still need a light fixture for the kitchen.)

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Home of Edin & Lena from Dusty Deco / Photos by Martin Löf for Elle Decoration.

Mmmmhmmm. The glossy white floor, the Smeg fridge, the whitewashed GROLAND island…pretty perfect. That rug makes the room, though.

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Photos by Karin Foberg for Hus & Hem

I don’t know if it’s because of the black floor, but I feel like this rug right here would be perfect in my kitchen. The problem is that finding a rug like the ones in this post seems like an exercise in futility, unless you have bucks to spend on a kitchen rug…which is not in the budget right now. Doesn’t it seem like you should be able to walk into any junk shop and find an old, beautiful rug that nobody wants just lying around? I keep thinking that’s going to happen, but it’s not happening.

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Yeah, I could live there is an occasional D16 feature wherein I post pictures of homes I want to break into, kick out the inhabitants and move in. Today, let’s play uninvited guests at the Copenhagen apartment of set designer Nadia Nabil Korsbæk, shall we?

What a sweet little eating area! I wish we could see more of the kitchen that’s off to the right, but the lumber-sided cabinets that are visible look very cool…and you know how I feel about square white tiles with dark grout. The cream-colored cabinet is so lovely with its bare wood interior, and I love a good set of mismatched chairs! So cozy.

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OH. Oh, oh, oh. I don’t know the story behind that table, but the shape is reminiscent of Prouvé’s EM table. The scrapwood technique reminds me of Piet Hein Eek. Wherever it’s from, it’s gorgeous. And more mismatched chairs! Four Eames DSWs and two Charlotte Perriand Les Arcs chairs (someday…). Perfect combination!

What about the pendant lamps? They must be vintage, yes? The scale is just right, and I’m amazed by how nice they look swagged across the ceiling like that with a hardwired chandelier only a few feet away. Somehow Scandinavians seem to be able to pull off stuff like that more easily than the rest of us. I’m trying to learn.

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Looking at more of the dining room, I kinda feel like that oversize antique mirror really makes the space. Right? And more scrapwood. And speaking of more scrapwood, see the bathtub? MORE SCRAPWOOD. More square white tiles with dark grout, too. I love when bathrooms and kitchens match.

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I noticed this in the dining room photo too, but see that rounded trim about a foot above the floor? I wonder if that’s actually just a strip of molding that’s been mounted higher than the baseboard to make it look more substantial. Do you know what I mean? So what’s between the two pieces of wood is actually wall, but since it’s all painted the same color (you can tell from the dining room photo that it’s slightly darker than the wall), it reads as one piece of molding. Am I making sense? Anyway, I really like that idea, even if it’s not what they did.

You know what? I don’t care how “overdone” it is at this point (as if!), sometimes all you need is a colorful Eames chair in a white room. And a plant. And some antlers. You know the formula. Hey…it works! I want to be in this room right now. Hopefully the homeowners won’t mind.

✚ All photos by Mette Wotkjær
✚ See the full article (and more photos!) at Femina

I love, love, love this ad for the German home improvement store Hornbach. Thanks to everyone who sent this to me!

Ad by Heimat Berlin; produced by Trigger Happy and directed by Pep Bosch.

✚ Related post (2009): Black houses.
(I think it might be time for an updated post about black houses!!)