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Remember when I went to Stockholm like three years ago? OK, it was last month, but geez, could it take me any longer to put a second post together? I know I’ll regret it if I don’t do it, though. Last night I was talking to a friend about how my blog still serves as a rough diary (albeit a very selective one) for me to refer back to, and how legitimately sad I feel that I haven’t written posts about a lot of stuff. My memory isn’t as good as I’d like it to be, and it’s comforting to be read old posts and see how I felt about things in my life when they happened. OK, so now that I’ve explained the arcane concept of a diary…haha.

The schedule on my second day in Stockholm was, to put it mildly, bananas.

10:15am — Get on bus to Skeppsholmen.
10:30am — Presentation about the history and design of both Hotel Skeppsholmen and the Nobis Hotel, both designed by the studio Claesson Koivisto Rune. Tour of Hotel Skeppsholmen.

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During the presentation at Hotel Skeppsholmen (which, by the way, is very beautiful), my eye wandered across the room to this AMAZINGLY FABULOUS textile hanging on the wall. I couldn’t stop looking at it. Unfortunately I couldn’t get a great full-size shot of it without moving the banquet table (don’t think I didn’t consider it), but you get the idea.

I asked the hotel director if he knew anything about it, and he said he was a little unsure but that he thought it was from the 1890s. This seemed a little bit maybe not right to me, but I wrote it my notebook and decided to look it up later.

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As I was looking at my photos, I noticed these details in the corner: The number 1961 (which seemed much more likely to me as the year of origin than 1890) and the initials MR. A little bit og Googling later, and I had answers! The textile, called “Karneval,” was designed by Marianne Richter (MR) for the Märta Måås-Fjetterström AB studio in 1961. If you have a whole bunch of money, keep an eye out for auctions! One recently sold for about $12,000. Gulp. (The photos at the auction link are much better than mine, by the way.)

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Visiting the Moderna Museet wasn’t on the agenda, sadly, but I did gaze longingly at it from the window while I was in Skeppsholmen.

11:30am — Walk to Arkdes for presentations on Swedish design at the Arkitektur– och Designcentrum. (The presentations were excellent and I took loads of notes, but I’m not sure how well they translate into a blog post. They did, however, give me an awful lot to think about when it comes to the future of design, Swedish politics, and sustainability.)

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1:00pm — Quick stop at the offices and library of Svensk Form, the Swedish Society of Crafts and Design.

I could easily have stayed there all day looking at the bound issues of Form Magazine, the world’s oldest design magazine, reaching back to 1905. I was in heaven…but only for 15 minutes. It was at this point that I started feeling very sad about having to adhere to such a strict schedule, but there wasn’t anything I could do about it. Next time. (I said “next time” a lot during this trip.)

1:15pm — Bus to Pizza Hatt, where designers from LAST introduced their new brand and collection of design pieces.

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2:30pm — The event scheduled for this slot was canceled, so the bus dropped us off at Svenskt Tenn for about 20 minutes.

Svenskt Tenn was on my list of places I really wanted to visit, so I’m grateful for even that short bit of time to quickly zip around the whole store and take in as much as possible. I admire Josef Frank and his work so much, and seeing it in this context was overwhelming and emotional (and over all too quickly…next time). As I was leaving, I noticed Barnaba Fornasetti on his way in! I was immediately star struck, and could barely manage to sneak a quick picture, much less introduce myself.

I later spotted Fornasetti and his son at my hotel eating breakfast, waiting for a cab on the street, at baggage check at the airport, again while going through security, and then buying a banana and browsing design magazines at a new stand. I think maybe he thought I was stalking him. And yes, he dresses like that all the time. Style for days. (When you have a minute, go look at this slideshow of Barnaba Fornasetti’s house—it is fabulous.)

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3:00pm — Bus to Snickarbacken 7′s art space, where woven vinyl pioneers Bolon were presenting their new collection. A short film by choreographed by Alexander Ekman (who was in attendance) was presented.

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While loitering around on the sidewalk waiting to get on the bus, I noticed that seemingly all of the businesses in Stockholm had lit up lanterns on the ground outside their doorways at dusk. The effect was so beautiful and welcoming, and all I could think about was how having an open flame on the ground in public in NYC couldn’t possibly be legal, and how sad that is. Then I remembered a story my mother told me about a Christmas tree decorated with candles (!) catching on fire when she was a child, and I started to question whether Swedes are committed to fire safety. Then I realized it had been about 20 hours since I’d eaten anything, and went back to enjoying the lanterns.

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4:30pm — Visit to ICEBAR by ICEHOTEL, where Monica Förster introduced her new designs.

The ICEBAR is exactly what you think it is: a bar made out of ice. The walls are ice, the bar is ice, the chairs are ice, even the glasses are ice. The floor is not ice. Helpers drape you in very heavy, very warm, surprisingly flattering capes before you enter. Drinking out of a glass made of ice is unsurprisingly unpleasant, but the lingonberry and vodka cocktails are delicious.

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5:45pm — Visit the FÄRG & BLANCHE design studio for the release of an art/dance/design film by architect Erika Janunger and choreographer Oskar Frisk.

There were fresh oranges and hot tea at the FÄRG & BLANCHE event, so I was able to fuel up a bit and get my senses back in order! The film was really beautiful, and a nice (if abstract) way to introduce a furniture line. The designers behind the line, Fredrik Färg Emma Marga Blanche, were very charming and graciously showed us around not only their showroom, but also the workshop at the back of their studio where they produce all of their pieces. I’ll be keeping an eye on them in the future…

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7:15pm — Exhibition and dinner at Note Design Studio.

Note’s studio is a knockout. The whole thing is white and glass from floor to ceiling, with black dots marking the tops and bottoms of the stairwells. A bunch of their designs were on display, and I fell in love with the Silo lamps. I fell in love with everything, actually, including the chef who went out of his way to prepare a beautiful vegan meal for me (after I sneaked into the kitchen and did a little bit of begging). Shaved fennel, radishes, and cauliflower with slivers of toasted bread. I don’t know what he used as dressing, but the flavor was both delicate and full at the same time—very subtly vinegar-ish and a bit sweet. I could eat like that all the time.

11:30pm — Arrive back at hotel, crash, burn.

The final installment in my Stockholm adventure, Part Three, is coming soon! For real soon, too, not two weeks soon. That’s the most fun day, the Furniture Fair!

Here’s Part One, if you missed it.

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YAY, I’m finally writing my first Stockholm post! I got back from my trip a week ago, but I’ve been scrambling to recuperate/catch up since then. If you follow me on Instagram then you’ve seen a bunch of snapshots, but holy mackerel (holy lutfisk?)…I took a lot of photos with my camera-camera. I kind of don’t even know where to start.

WHAT A TRIP. I left for Stockholm the evening of Saturday the 1st, lost an entire night of sleep to the 6-hour time change and the 9 hours of traveling, then arrived at noon-ish local time on Sunday. I can’t sleep on planes no matter how hard I try or don’t try, so I was a mess by the time I got to the hotel. I pulled myself together and met up with my aunt and cousin (who was at work 5 minutes from my hotel) for lunch, though, which was really fun! I’d never spent time with my aunt apart from my mother before, and in her absence I felt very moved by how similar they are. They may live thousands of miles apart, but they are sisters to the bone—and I love knowing that there’s another person in the world who reminds me of my mother. (I feel more than a little choked up writing this…)

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From there I met up with Emma, who very kindly took me around to some of her favorite shops in the area despite the icy rain that was falling. Unfortunately a lot of stores are closed on Sunday (or because it gets dark at 4:00 in the afternoon!), so we were a bit limited, but I still managed to take in some of the city and squeeze in fika time at Snickarbacken 7. Mostly it was just so nice to spend time with Emma! We’ve known each other through blogging for years now, but we’d never met in person before. I felt instantly comfortable being with her.

Side note: I love saying “snickarbacken.” Google translate tells me it means “carpenter hill,” but I prefer to imagine it having something to do with peanuts and caramel and maybe a graham cracker crust.

I stayed at the incredibly fancy Nobis Hotel (more on that later), which is in what travelers call an “ideal” location, but it’s really a very touristy/business-y part of the city. I still don’t really have a great sense of Stockholm geography, but I’ve learned that next time I probably want to stay in Södermalm, which I repeatedly heard referred to as “the Brooklyn of Stockholm” and “the Williamsburg of Stockholm.” As a transplanted Brooklynite, I understand what that means (nope, I’m not going to use the H-word)…so, noted!

Anyway, despite being a bit restricted by location, Emma and I had an amazing dinner out at Riche. Their menu is decidedly un-vegan, but the chef was MORE than happy (I’d say he was excited, even) to prepare a special vegan meal on the fly for me. I don’t even remember everything that was on my plate because I was so tired and I wasn’t thinking about foodstagrams, but I do know that there was a vegan risotto, a fennel salad and something with hazelnuts. Whatever it all was, it was DELICIOUS. Such a nice place to sit and talk, too.

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Even though my photos of it aren’t great, I need to mention the Nobis Hotel, who put me up for the three nights I was in Stockholm. The Nobis is by far the fanciest hotel I’ve ever stayed in (though to be fair, it’s competing mostly with fleabag roadside joints—I don’t have much fancy hotel experience). It’s located in a former bank—a very famous bank, in fact—the one where the Norrmalmstorg robbery took place in 1973, and where the term “Stockholm syndrome” comes from. It’s a gorgeous building, with its protected late-1800s interior layout and architecture preserved yet made contemporary by the Swedish firm Claesson Koivisto Rune in 2010. The picture above is of the ceiling over the atrium that houses a lounge area.

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Orla Kiely toiletries, Scandinavian design everywhere, and a collection of great lamps from all over the world in the lobby. I wish I’d taken more photos, but I didn’t have much time at the Nobis during daylight hours. Here’s a really nice collection of both the common areas and the rooms, if you’re interested to see more. So. Damn. Fancy. (Also, the mattress and pillows? They’re making me rethink my entire approach to sleeping at home, where my bed now feels like a pile of rocks in comparison.)

After that first afternoon in Stockholm, I basically had NO free time whatsoever to do anything on my own. There were media events (and the Furniture Fair, of course) scheduled from early morning until late at night, so no time to go to shops or museums or restaurants that weren’t part of the Design Week tour. So Monday and Tuesday were jam-packed, and then I left for New York very early Wednesday morning. Talk about a whirlwind! My sleep schedule was completely crushed, and I brought home a nasty cold and a whole lot of exhaustion with me. It was a amazing trip, yes, but I really wish I could have added on a couple of extra days just to be able to breathe a little and get out to explore Stockholm. Next time.

I have SO MUCH MORE to talk about and share from my trip, but it’s too much for one post—I think it might be more like a dozen posts! Next up, lots of studio visits. For now, I leave you with a collection of Instagrams from Stocklhom…a little taste of what’s to come.

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Poster designed by Marcus Eriksson

I’m not usually a fan of being surprised, but sometimes crazy, unexpected GOOD things happen. This is one of those times, and even though part of me is sure there’s been a mistake, I’m letting myself be CRAZY excited.

A couple of weeks ago, I got an email totally out of the blue from the Consulate General of Sweden. That in and of itself was pretty exciting (I figured it was maybe an invitation to an event in NYC), but then I read the whole email…and IT WAS AN INVITATION TO SWEDEN. Specifically, it was an invitation to attend the Stockholm Furniture Fair in February! YAY!!

And, like, everything is paid for. The flight, the hotel, the food…seriously? For me? Yeah, seriously. What is this craziness?! I guess this is a totally normal thing for other people, but not in my world. You might as well have told me I’d won the lottery. (OK, maybe not Mega Millions, but a really good scratch-off.) How did this happen? I have NO idea, but it did, am I’m going. To Stockholm! My motherland! To look at tons of innovative and beautiful new furniture and lighting! And take pictures and talk to people! In Sweden! Me! Anna!

Once I convinced myself the email was real, I started thinking about how remarkable it is that the Swedish Consulate has a program in place to promote Swedish culture in the United States, and that part of that program includes covering the cost of transporting New Yorkers to Stockholm to learn about Swedish design. I guess I don’t know for sure, but something tells me there aren’t US Consulates bringing people from Europe to the US to cover American design. Are there?

The Stockholm Furniture Fair has been on my radar for as long as I’ve been reading Emmas Designblogg and admiring all of the photos she takes when she attends every year, but I never imagined I’d get to go. I am really looking forward to seeing as many booths as I can (the list of exhibitors is bananas, so I need to strategize…and get comfortable using Evan’s old iPad), taking loads of photos, writing up a ton of notes, and meeting lots of people. I’ll blog about the entire experience and all of my favorite discoveries, of course!!

I’m only going to be in Stockholm for a few days, but I’m hoping I’ll be able to find a little time to visit with my aunt and uncle while I’m there. I haven’t seen them since they were in New York several years ago—the last (and only) time I visited Sweden was when I was 10 years old! Even though that was 28 years ago, I still remember so much about the trip and about Stockholm. The only thing that could make this better would be if my mother were able to come along, but maybe next time.

What a great opportunity this is! I feel very, very lucky.

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A little more than a year ago, I wrote a post about how little traveling I do. It was difficult to write because it’s always been something I’m a bit ashamed of, but (as is often the case with the posts I hesitate to write) I felt braver and stronger once it was done. A few weeks later I traveled to London and had a wonderful time. This past June I went to my friends Lisa and Clay’s beautiful wedding in San Francisco, last month I went to Palm Springs for Camp Mighty and yesterday I got back from a long weekend in New Orleans! Look at me: Anna Dorfman, occasional traveler. Who could have predicted?

A very good friend of mine moved from Brooklyn to New Orleans about six years ago, and I’d been talking about the possibility of making a visit for a while. Our birthdays are a couple of days apart (I turned 38 right before Halloween — hello, 38!), and just by chance it turned out that The Cure were scheduled to play on the last night of Voodoo Fest. K and I met because of our love for The Cure and it’d been years since we’d gone to a show together…so really, how could I not go? Everything just seemed to fall into place perfectly. This was my first visit to New Orleans, and I loved it. What a magical place!

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K and her husband and son live in an incredible 1875 house in the Bywater neighborhood. She has always had the best sense of style when it comes to interiors, and unsurprisingly her home is amazingly beautiful inside and out. I slept in a bedroom painted black from the bottom up, save for a white beadboard ceiling. So perfect and cave-like. (And no, sorry, she doesn’t have a blog, haha. Believe me, it was all I could do to not take a million pictures!)

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Like all grown-up former (?) goths, we made sure to visit a cemetery. Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 is the oldest in New Orleans, all crumbly and beautiful and densely packed. (I also just learned that a New Kids on the Block video was filmed there, so, um, a slight reduction in goth points.)

GOATS!!! This guy was just walking around a residential neighborhood with a couple of goats on leashes. They were super soft.

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Top to bottom, left to right:
(1) I have a new appreciation for shutters now, especially when they’re floor-to-ceiling (2) Pretty outdoor lights at Pizza Delicious (the vegan campanelle was very good) (3) Living room mantle, fancy fancy (4) Belated vegan peanut butter birthday cake from Shake Sugary (5) Me, all moody right before the Cure concert (6) Matching manicures (Saints colors totally unintentional) with my waiter at Booty’s

Here’s a silly little video I made of a lenticular photo stuck to a door in the French Quarter. Love!

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Top to bottom, left to right:
(1) Drinks at Cane & Table — I had the Valeira Gorge: Portal Tawny Port, Banks 7 Year Rum, lime, fresh coconut water, vanilla and Angostura bitters (2) Skulls grow on agave plants in New Orleans, FACT (3) Dinner from the Fat Falafel truck (4) Freret Street (5) LIZARD!!! I saw a lizard in the wild for the first time, very exciting (6) Perfect tofu scrambles and coffees at Satsuma

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This is Willie. He was just a little kid when he lived in Brooklyn, and now he’s an old man. I love French bulldogs and all of their grunty croissant-marshmallow-bodiedness. He’s such a sweet guy, and a very patient model.

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THE CURE!!! Yayyyyyyyy. I’ve never succeeded in taking good photos at a Cure concert, and this time was no exception (here are some MUCH better ones!). No matter, though, because the show was great as usual. The Cure will for always and ever be my most favorite band, and the best way to experience them (I mean other than locked in your dark bedroom with headphones on, age 15) is LIVE. Their festival shows are shorter by default, but 2+ hours is still nothing to sneeze at. Plus, I got to hear “Burn” played live for the first time ever, and it sounded like a whole new song — like it came off of Pornography instead of The Crow soundtrack! So great.

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Some classic Robert Smith dance moves…

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My lovely friend Roger doing his thing up on on stage. Toss that hair, shake that tambourine! What a fun night. It’s been two years since the last time I saw The Cure, which is far too long to go between shows. I’m so glad I made this trip!

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Full setlist:
Shake Dog Shake / Fascination Street / From the Edge of the Deep Green Sea / The End of the World / Lovesong / Just Like Heaven / Burn / Pictures of You / Lullaby / High / Hot Hot Hot!!! / The Caterpillar / The Walk / Stop Dead / Push / Inbetween Days / Friday I’m in Love / Doing the Unstuck / Bananafishbones / Want / The Hungry Ghost / Wrong Number / One Hundred Years / Give Me It // (encore) The Love Cats / Close to Me / Let’s Go to Bed / Why Can’t I Be You? / Boys Don’t Cry

Thank you so, so much to K (+ family) for being such wonderful hosts and for having me stay in your beautiful home. I had the most amazing time. And thank you Roger for everything I can possibly thank a person for.

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Do you remember a post I wrote recently about being a goat-petter rather than a goal-setter? About how I don’t have a “life list,” and why I don’t feel like making one would make me a happier person? It’s right here. When I wrote that post, I truly expected to get a lot of responses from people telling me why I should have a life list, why setting specific goals is important and asking why am I being such a defeatist downer? Well, that didn’t happen. Instead, lots of you spoke up to say you felt the same way. I was in equal parts shocked, enlightened and comforted.

If you know about life lists and you read blogs, then you probably know who Maggie Mason (a.k.a Mighty Girl) is. Maggie is the queen of the life list — she even started Go Mighty to help people create their own life lists. My post was absolutely not directed at her specifically, but I was a little concerned that it would come across as an attack of some sort. I was relieved and happy when Maggie herself chimed in to say that despite her belief in life lists, she agrees with me — and that she tends to attract friends who are like me. Goat-petters and goal-setters, co-existing in harmony!

So anyway, you know what wound up happening? Maggie asked me if I’d be interested in speaking at Camp Mighty, an annual retreat now in its 3rd year. It’s all about connecting people through panel discussions, workshops and socializing to encourage the motivation and support needed to realize goals. They also raise a bunch of money for Charity: Water in the process. The whole thing goes down at the Ace Hotel in Palm Springs, and by all accounts, it’s a good time.

Now, I know what you’re thinking: “Anna, aside from the water part, this kind of sounds like your worst nightmare. Isn’t this exactly the sort of thing you think is a bunch of nonsense?” And yeah, that’s a fair enough assessment. I’m a cynic. I’m a jerk-faced cynic with all kinds of issues about everything. Large groups of people (especially when they’re predominantly female), make me uncomfortable. Bathing suits make me uncomfortable. Hugging strangers makes me uncomfortable. Having my picture taken makes me uncomfortable. The idea of public speaking makes me uncomfortable. “Networking” makes me uncomfortable. Why in the world would anyone fly across the country to do something like this when they could be at home on the sofa watching Three’s Company reruns with their dogs? And to paraphrase Woody Allen paraphrasing Groucho Marx, I just don’t want to belong to any club that would have someone like me for a member.

Here’s the thing, though: Underneath the cynicism, I get it. I really do. And I’m really not a jerk-faced cynic all the time. I also understand that Maggie didn’t ask me to speak at Camp Mighty because she thinks I’m going to be converted to life list-ism. She asked me because I have a different perspective to offer, and because there are probably going to be at least a few people there with whom that perspective will resonate. I think I can do that — even if I’m not going to make a life list or go swimming.

So I said yes. And it’ll be good. Do you want to come? I hope you do.

Camp Mighty 2013
When: October 17–19, 2013
Where: Ace Hotel; Palm Springs, CA
Discount: Register with the code “DoorSixteen” to save $50 off registration

If you’re planning to go, please let me know! As uncertain as I know I sound, I really am excited about this — albeit super nervous and full of self-doubt and all that kind of stuff. I mean, have you looked at the list of speakers?! A bunch of my friends (including a few folks I’ve never met in person before!) will be there, though, and hopefully I’ll get to meet some of you, too, which makes it a whole lot less scary. See you there?

(Photo from the Ace Hotel Palm Springs website)

Having been forced to leave Brooklyn because of Sandy (and feeling more than a bit useless as a result—I am eager to get back and help my community there), I’ve been effectively Newburgh-bound for the past week. My friend Jen from the lovely blog Honey Kennedy is here with me, as her long-planned vacation in NYC was completely upended by the storm. We decided to get ourselves out of the house for a bit and take a drive north up to my hometown, Rhinebeck.

We drove up on the east side of the Hudson River and stopped off at the Vanderbilt Mansion in Hyde Park along the way. The estate is open to the public, and even though I’ve been there many times in my life (admittedly most of them prior to age 13—that’s just how it is when you grow up in the Hudson Valley), I’ve never really taken it all in through adult (am I an adult?) eyes. So beautiful.

We got to Rhinebeck in the late afternoon. The skies had turned gray and drizzly, my favorite kind of light. Our fall foliage season seems to be dragging on for longer than usual this year, and there are still plenty of red, orange and yellow leaves hanging around. As much as I detested Rhinebeck as a teenager (and as much as I am grateful to live in cities with far greater diversity as an adult), it is nice to go back there every now and then. It’s sort of like a storybook idea of a small town, with block after block of perfectly-maintained houses built in the 1800s, slate sidewalks, smoke shop Indians, and tiny restaurants that close when the sun goes down.

Even though I’ve now lived away from Rhinebeck longer than I lived there, it’s still the only place where I don’t need to rely on my shoddy (non-)sense of direction. I know the roads of the village like the back of my hand. It feels like home. It’s hard for me to admit that. I guess I have a few places that feel like home to me.

A dusty purple house on South Street, my favorite cemetery, the Johnson’s old house on South Parsonage, Foster’s Coach House Tavern (I had French fries and red wine)…and a few Instagrams, too. I lived in that little red house until I was 17 and left for college. Every time I go back to Rhinebeck I’m happy to see it’s still red.

I dunno. I guess it’s just a thing with most people’s hometowns, right? They seem so much nicer after you leave.

(I like looking at people looking at art nearly as much as I like looking at art itself.)

Yesterday I had lunch at the Tate Modern and then walked around several of the exhibits, including the Edvard Munch show that’s currently on display. I loved the structure itself, a decommissioned steel-framed brick power station built in the 1950s and converted in the 1990s. It reminded me a bit of DIA:Beacon across the river from Newburgh—the same kind of space is afforded to larger works, something that’s not always possible in a cities where square footage is at a premium.

As overly-familiar as I thought I was with Munch’s work, I had never seen his photographic self-portraits before. There were a huge number of them on display, and that was definitely my favorite part of the show.

I can’t help feeling a little burst of hometown pride whenever I see work Newburgh’s own Ellsworth Kelly on display.

My unabashed love for Joseph Beuys continues! Beuys is one of those artists whose work can never translate well to photos or the printed page, so I’ll take any opportunity I can to see it in person.

And some thoughts about being here in general…

Last night when my London host and I were out, he asked what my impression was of London and its people so far, and I didn’t really have an answer. I thought about it for a minute, and then realized that don’t actually have the sense of “otherness” here that I expected to. Honestly, going to the New Jersey suburbs for a day feels far more foreign to me than the short time I’ve spent in London so far does. It feels different from NYC in the same way the Philadelphia does, I suppose. Earlier in the day when my host was wondering if he should tell me about the history and significance of places we were talking through, I say yes, of course—but then realized that I am the sort of person who tends to regard every new experience in life in sort of the same, equal way. I don’t expect to be awed, but it’s just as likely that I’ll be impressed (for lack of a better word) by a centuries-old building as I would a beautiful contemporary textile or a well-designed book cover. The meaning afforded to locations by the course of history just doesn’t matter much to me if I don’t have a personal connection. I’m not saying that’s a positive, really, it’s just who I am for whatever reason. Interesting to discover these things about myself, in any case.

p.s. Thank you so much for all of the suggestions for Saturday plans on yesterday’s post. So many great ideas!

I did it! I got on a plane all by myself and flew to another place that is not in New York. I even used money that isn’t dollars! Good thing I know how to speak English. There was a snafu at the airport that culminated in having to unexpectedly take a taxi to my destination, but it all turned out just fine. My driver was a former schoolteacher who gave it all up for a new career as a cabbie, and he was very excited to talk to someone from New York about the whole thing. His entire knowledge of NYC seemed to come from watching Taxi Driver and Saturday Night Fever, so he was a bit disappointed that I don’t have a classic New York accent, but I tried to represent my city well! (He was also slightly obsessed with Florida and Disney World, two things I know virtually nothing about, but I listened and smiled and tried to be impressed when told about his daughter’s wedding at Cinderella’s Castle…)

Yesterday was really just spent recovering from my overnight flight and relaxing, and I actually woke up this morning at 7:00 AM London time with no alarm clock, so hopefully I’ve avoided getting bad jet lag. I’ve opted to not really make plans and instead leave that up to my host, and that’s keeping me from being swallowed up by all of the travel-related anxieties I’ve written about having. So today we’re heading to the Tate and the Design Museum, both of which I’m sure I’ll enjoy immensely.

Look at me! Traveling!

p.s. I’ve been told that I have to decide what to do on Saturday. So…here’s your chance: If I can only do ONE thing on Saturday in London, what should it be? (Keep in mind that I have zero interest in the royal family, etc.)